Research seminars in 2019 / 2020

The seminar series takes place on the following Thursdays in the lecture room (2nd floor) at TIB's Science and Technology Site

 

October 17, 2019

14:00 - 15:00 Data and Big Data in the Sciences

Moderator: Gábor Kismihók (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)
Stefano Canali (Institute of Philosophy of Leibniz Universität Hannover)

 

Abstract:

The phrases ‘big data’ is increasingly present in the public sphere, in connection with a certain rhetoric associating increasing volumes of data with revolutionary changes. In this context, the sciences are often mentioned as examples of this revolution. But are the sciences actually undergoing a big data revolution? Why is scientific (big) data something that we should care about? And why should we discuss data from a philosophical standpoint?

Stefano Canali is a post-doc at the Institute of Philosophy of Leibniz Universität Hannover. He has studied Philosophy at the University of Milan, philosophy of science and science and technology studies at University College London and has done his PhD in Hannover. His research is in philosophy of science, with particular focus on the philosophy of biomedicine and the philosophy of data-intensive science.

December 5, 2019

14:00 - 15:00 Changing Perspectives and a Changing World - Humans at the Centre of Socio-Technical Systems Development

Moderator: Gábor Kismihók (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)
Abiodun Ogunyemi (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)

 

Abstract:

Our world continues to change at a fast pace. Machines, humans, interaction, and space continue to change. Technology continues to play a crucial role in our daily life. Humans are a no longer passive consumer of digital systems but co-creators and co-builders. Beyond the system’s interface, we are also operating in an “interspace” inhabited by people, computers, and other devices, in a "complex web of interactions". The human-computer interaction (HCI) field employs a multidisciplinary approach towards designing, evaluating, and implementing interactive systems for human use.  The needs and expectations of the end-users have to be significantly factored into the development of interactive systems. To achieve this, HCI uses techniques borrowed from computer science, psychology, sociology, and ethnology among others to collect, analyze, interpret users' data and incorporate the results in the product design for product creation. At the same time, we are in effect creating new worlds when we create new products. Socio-technical systems development must not only be technically-driven, but must take into account the social context of the process of a product, and service creation. For this reason, the user-centred design approach has become a norm for successful system development. In this presentation, I will share the case of Europeana Media. Europeana Media uses the user-centred design approach to gather user requirements, plan, analyze, design, and evaluate the product.

Abiodun Ogunyemi received his Ph.D. at Tallinn University in the field of Informatics with a core focus on Human-Computer Interaction. He worked for some years as an industry practitioner before moving to academia in 2013. Presently, he works in the lab for Non-textual materials at TIB as a User Researcher/UX studies Specialist on Europeana Media project. His research interests are in human-centred software engineering, measuring impacts of digital transformation, explainable AI, and information retrieval.

 

February 6, 2020

14:00 - 15:00 Learner Autonomy in Digitalized Education

Moderator: Gábor Kismihók (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)
Olga Lezhnina (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)

 

Abstract:

In this presentation, students’ ICT autonomy as a crucially important quality required for effective digitalization of education is discussed. Results of research conducted by Learning and Skill Analytics Research Group (Olga Lezhnina and Gábor Kismihók) on PISA dataset are reported to illustrate the role of ICT autonomy in contemporary education.   

Olga Lezhnina is a research assistant at the TIB, Learning and Skill Analytics Research Group. She had degrees in physics, psychology and learning sciences (LMU Munich). Currently, she applies statistical and machine learning approaches to attitudinal aspects of human-technology interaction in large-scale educational datasets (PISA).

April 2, 2020

14:00 - 15:00 Have Massive Open Online Courses fulfilled the high hopes and great expectations of an open and global digital higher education world?

Moderator: Gábor Kismihók (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)
Anna Kosmützky (Leibniz Center of Science and Society (LCSS) at the Leibniz University Hannover)

 

Abstract:

In my talk, I will focus on the spatial dynamics and development of the MOOC providers from a macro-perspective. Based on a multi-level conception of spatial dynamics and a panel data set (2011-2017), I will show that the “MOOC market” is – other than initially hoped and expected – not a fully open digital higher education landscape but instead has expanded worldwide driven to a large extent by national higher education strategies. It thus has a nested two-level spatial structure both on a global scale and within many national higher education systems. The results should provide a fruitful starting point for discussing the relationship between digitalization and local institutional embedding of higher education. 

Anna Kosmützky is a sociologist and professor for the “Methodology of Higher Education and Science Research” at the Leibniz Center of Science and Society (LCSS) at the Leibniz Universität Hannover and director of the center. Her research comprises higher education research, science research, and organizational studies and focusses on the methodology of comparative research, globalization, and transnationalization processes in higher education (and beyond) as well as institutional and organizational change of higher education and research organizations. She conducted a research project on Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers from 2017-2019. 

 

June 4, 2020

14:00 - 15:00 How do researchers perceive visualisations of scientometric information?

Moderator: Gábor Kismihók (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)
Grischa Fraumann (Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) - Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology)

 

Abstract:

This talk will present outcomes of the BMBF-funded project "Reference implementation for Open Scientometric Indicators" (ROSI).

Grischa Fraumann is a Research Assistant at TIB Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology in the Open Science Lab. He obtained the Erasmus Mundus Joint Master’s Degree in Research and Innovation in Higher Education (MARIHE) from Danube University Krems, University of Tampere and Beijing Normal University. Prior to his master’s, he completed his undergraduate degree in Hispanic Studies, Sociology and History at the University of Mannheim and the University of Deusto in Bilbao. His research interests include altmetrics, higher education research and research policy.

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